Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine National Effectiveness Study for 12-18 Year Olds – “Vaccine Works for Kids!” “


Dr Elizabeth Mack, left, and pediatric intensive care unit nurse Alexandra Rosol attend to an unvaccinated patient at the PICU. Credit: MUSC

A team of MUSC researchers Shawn Jenkins Children’s Hospital contributed to a national study on the effectiveness of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19[feminine vaccin contre l’hospitalisation chez les enfants de 12 à 18 ans. L’étude a été menée par 19 hôpitaux dans 16 États. Les résultats de l’étude, publiés dans le Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Rapport hebdomadaire de morbidité et de mortalitét, montrent que le vaccin est efficace contre l’hospitalisation dans cette population.

«Les gens supposent que les enfants ont un cours COVID-19 beaucoup plus doux. Mais la variante Delta est différente », a déclaré Elizabeth Mack, MD, pédiatre en soins intensifs et chercheur principal pour le site d’étude MUSC.

“Le [study] the results showed that the [Pfizer-BioNTech] the vaccine was extremely effective, and some of the hospitalized COVID-19 patients who were not protected by the vaccine had fairly severe courses. “- Dr Elizabeth Mack

Mack explained that 100% of COVID-19 pediatric patients hospitalized at MUSC Shawn Jenkins Children’s Hospital since the start of the pandemic have not been vaccinated.

Mack also pointed out that children infected with the Delta variant were more likely to have a disease similar to the adult phenotype. In other words, all of their organs are at risk of damage, not just the lungs. Children in the South were at particularly high risk due to low vaccination rates and a high number of co-morbidities, including obesity and asthma.

“We have seen children with COVID-19 in intensive care with horrific respiratory failure, kidney failure, liver failure, cardiovascular failure, and we have unfortunately also seen deaths,” Mack said.

The national study included 464 hospitalized children aged 12 to 18. Some of these children have been hospitalized for COVID-19. Other children in the study were enrolled as hospitalized controls with syndromes similar to COVID-19, such as pneumonia, or with syndromes unrelated to COVID-19, such as a broken leg. The vaccination and exposure history was then studied for COVID-19 patients and control patients. MUSC Shawn Jenkins Children’s Hospital continues to add COVID-19 hospital patients to the study.

Alexandra Rosol and Elizabeth Mack

PICU nurse Alexandra Rosol, left, and Dr. Elizabeth Mack, right, discussing a patient. Credit: MUSC

“The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine in children 12 to 18 years old after receiving two injections,” Mack said. “The results showed that the vaccine was extremely effective and that some of the hospitalized COVID-19 patients who were not protected by the vaccine had fairly severe courses. “

Mack also explained that there was a high frequency of heart muscle inflammation due to COVID-19 or multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, distinct from the very low risk of vaccine-related myocarditis.

“We only had one or two cases of heart muscle inflammation from the vaccine, and these patients had normal heart function and only needed ibuprofen. They were sent home in a day or two, ”Mack explained.

In South Carolina, 66% of children aged 12 to 19 are still not vaccinated.

“In intensive care, we see a lot of parents wanting their children to be immunized. These children have multisystem organ failures, months in intensive care, numerous procedures, financial devastation and wasted school time. – Dr Elizabeth Mack

“The low vaccination rates in the pediatric population at this point are probably not primarily related to access to the vaccine,” Mack said, explaining that some parents are reluctant to have their children vaccinated. “Fertility and puberty are the main concerns of parents, but fortunately the data supports the vaccination of adolescents and women without negatively impacting these problems. “

Mack explained that studies on the long-term effects of the vaccine are underway. However, the long-term effects of COVID-19 have already been devastating. Some children required intensive rehabilitation in a hospital setting, others required a tracheostomy, and still others had long-lasting kidney or heart disease.

“In intensive care, we see a lot of parents wanting their children to be immunized,” Mack said. “These children have multisystem organ failures, months in intensive care, numerous procedures, financial devastation and wasted school time.”

The study showed that the Pfizer-BioNtech vaccine was effective against hospitalization in patients aged 12 to 18 years, during the period when the Delta variant was predominant.

“COVID-19 and its effects are all ‘vaccine preventable’,” Mack said. “The vaccine works for children!

Reference: “Efficacy of Pfizer-BioNTech mRNA Vaccination Against COVID-19 Hospitalization in People 12-18 Years of Age – United States, June-September 2021” by Samantha M. Olson, MPH; Margaret M. Newhams, MPH; Natasha B. Halasa, MD; Ashley M. Price, MPH; Julie A. Boom, MD; Leila C. Sahni, Ph.D.; Katherine Irby, MD; Tracie C. Walker, MD; Stephanie P. Schwartz, MD; Pia S. Pannaraj, MD; Aline B. Maddux, MD; Tamara T. Bradford, MD; Ryan A. Nofziger, MD; Benjamin J. Boutselis; Melissa L. Cullimore, MD; Elizabeth H. Mack, MD; Jennifer E. Schuster, MD; Shira J. Gertz, MD; Natalie Z. Cvijanovich, MD; Michèle Kong, MD; Melissa A. Cameron, MD; Mary A. Staat, MD; Emily R. Levy, MD; Brandon M. Chatani, MD; Kathleen Chiotos, MD; Laura D. Zambrano, PhD; Angela P. Campbell, MD; Manish M. Patel, MD; Adrienne G. Randolph, MD and Overcoming COVID-19 Investigators, October 19, 2021, Weekly Morbidity and Mortality Report.
DOI: 10.15585 / mmwr.mm7042e1


Sara H. Byrd